Live Reviews

 

Nottingham Post. The Old Ship Lowdam. February 19th. 2014
Palmer has been categorised as 'English Americana', a term that she rightly finds 'lazy'. This Warthog gig at the Old Ship Inn demonstrated that her canon is far more rich and varied than that. There were references to the US with 'trucker song', Fishtails, Rose of Sharon, based on John Steinbeck's, Grapes of Wrath and Fool's Gold, reminiscent of the Charlie Daniels Band.

 

Palmer confided that of her 6 albums only the last four still remain. Her first was only a small run whilst the second has been removed from sale given she is not happy with the arrangements and production. She dipped into the remaining four throughout the gig as well as showcasing some newer material. One being the intriguing, Song Of The Drowning Sailor, who had set sail to the north in search of new lands but whose last song we'll hear during the voyage.

Life in France has had an influence on Palmer particularly sharing bottles of wine with neighbours into the early hours. However, it has also been a creative spur. Coming Home, with a sunny mandolin motif from Curran, had been written in the gardens of the Blue Trout Hotel in the French mountains, and could be the perfect driving song on a summer’s day. The duo also played Palmer's most requested number, another with a Gallic flavour. La Rue Du Chat Qui Pêche sounds almost romantic. In fact, it's The Street Of The Cat Who Fished, which, by Palmer's account, backs on to 'Bacteria Alley' because folks often leave with a 'jippy tummy' .

Vocally Palmer moved easily between melodic storytelling, and more gravelling, Raising Hurricanes. For his part, Curran segued seamlessly between mandolin and fiddle, often on the same song, and had an occasional foray onto guitar. He also acted as an understated foil to Palmer's quips. New track, Fresco, a love song, best showcased Curran's violin work as he created the feel of a plaintive Irish Air.
Referring to the previous Warthog concert, Palmer hinted that she'd love to come back with the full band. In the meantime folks had to be satisfied with an encore of, Michelangelo.

Mark Salter

 

 

Event: Angie Palmer 

Venue: The Duchess
Town: York
Date: September 24 2009


I bumped into Angie Palmer outside The Duchess just as dusk approached on a relatively warm York evening, just as the singer-songwriter was making her way down to the neighbouring Fibbers night club, where another gig was about to commence. 'Hope you're not escaping to another gig' I said as she walked towards me with her companion. 'No, we're just going to see some friends before they go on, Wreckless Eric's on downstairs tonight'. This may be the reason behind my recent rant on why everyone seems to disappear in York whenever anyone of importance is playing. Perhaps there's just too much going on at the same time and choices have to be made!
Angie delayed her visit 'downstairs' to speak to me for ten minutes whilst the sound of the two support bands filtered throughout the darkened corridors of The Duchess during their respective sound checks. The Lancaster born singer-songwriter was seemingly relaxed before the gig, wearing tight denim jeans and black waistcoat, as any self respecting rock chick should, as we sat and discussed everything from Dylan and Debussy to travelling though Europe, playing with a superb bunch of musicians collectively known as The Revelators and most importantly, her current album 'Meanwhile, as Night Falls..'Later, after two excellent support spots by Suzy Bradley and the Morning After and the fabulously tight Jen Low Band, Angie Palmer walked onto stage with an acoustic guitar, a bunch of well-crafted and easily assessable songs and was flanked by an ensemble of excellent players, all completely in tune with every single move their leader made.

Opening with three consecutive songs from her current album, the Alan Gregson (Cornershop) produced 'Meanwhile, as Night Falls..', Angie soon fell into a relaxed groove during "On the Eve", "The Fiery Lake" and "After the Lights Have Gone", all pretty much exactly how they appear on the album. For the delightful "After the Lights Have Gone", Angie urged the audience to pull up some comfortable chairs and come a little closer. A true artist knows instinctively how to make the best out of a not so good situation. If the room isn’t bursting at the seams, then draw the small audience in, come a little closer, let's get intimate.

The atmosphere was intimate and the audience did indeed move closer to the band, which consisted of birthday boy Billy Buckley on guitars, Richard Curran on fiddle and mandolin, Ollie Collins on bass and Sophie Hasting on drums. Revisiting her two previous albums Road (2005) and Tales of Light and Darkness (2006), with the hard rocking "Fishtails" and the equally powerful "Footprints in the Snow" from the former and the funky "Letters From Home" and "Fool’s Gold" and finally a song which Angie referred to as a 'rarity', the love song "Michelangelo" from the latter, Angie demonstrated a good cross section of songs from her most important period.Two more songs from the new album were selected for the set including the Johnny Cash inspired rocker "I Hear That Locomotive", which Angie invited the audience to provide suitable train sounds, which to a York audience shouldn’t be too difficult. Then the adult version of Little Red Riding Hood, "Hunting the Wolf", introduced in French, produced one of the highlights of the night both in terms of tightness of arrangement, including Billy Buckley's astonishing sneer of a guitar solo, and in tension building, courtesy of Ollie Collins' bowed bass and Richard Curran's demonic fiddle playing.

One of the songs I was most looking forward to hearing live and one that was more than satisfactorily realised tonight.The final song, which really couldn’t be followed by an encore, was the magnificent "Weeping Wood", the song that concludes the new album. I knew it was coming as Angie had told me in advance of the gig that she would be performing it. 'But can you possibly give it the full whack?' I asked before the show. 'We'll give it as much welly as we can but obviously we can't bring the full string section, or an organ or a large gong', Angie cheerfully responded. Judging by the satisfied expression on the faces of each and every member of the audience tonight, I think it was just right.

Allan Wilkinson
 


Alnwick Playhouse, Northumberland.
Saturday 7th February 2009
Alan Harrison for  Maverick Magazine

Oh the joys of the British musical troubadour. Angie Palmer played in front of a packed capacity of 65 in a Temperance Hall in Cumbria the previous evening and then spent the whole day driving across the snow bound roads of Northern England to get to the pretty market town of Alnwick in Northumberland just in time for tonight’s gig in front of a half full theatre. Did this bother her? Not in the slightest.
Angie and the band arrived on stage spot on 7.30 and opened with ‘On the Eve’ which is also the opening track from her latest album, ‘MEANWHILE AS NIGHT FALLS.’
I like it when songwriters explain their stories behind the songs and Angie Palmer is very friendly and chatty; reminding me of Nanci Griffith and Mary Chapin-Carpenter when she recounts her tales. Her description of the locals taking her to their heart when she visited Corsica for a folk festival in her introduction to ‘Deep Blue Sea’ added even more depth to an already beautiful song.
The first half was ended with two songs from a previous album; ‘Tales of Light and Darkness’; ‘Fools Gold’ and ‘Letters from home’, with both chugging along in classic Country fashion ably aided and abetted by Billy Buckley’s signature twangy Stratocaster.
By the time the audience had filed out of the main hall; Angie was already at the CD stall and spent the next 20 minutes chatting with fans and signing cd’s like a trouper.
Angie then opened the second half with ‘If I was’ which featured some of the most gorgeous Mandolin playing I’ve ever heard; from Richard Curran.
My favourite introduction of the evening was reserved for ‘Coming Home’. Angie explained that she’d been moved to tears the previous week when she’d heard the news that John Martyn had died and proceeded to tell us what an influence he’d had over her career and how she had even felt his presence when she was writing the song; which more than lived up to the preface and Billy’s soaring guitar and Richards’ mandolin and violin superbly complimented Angie’s gorgeous voice on this plaintive tale.
By now it was obvious that Angie and the band were enjoying themselves as much as the audience; especially when she recounted a review of ‘Hunting the Wolf’ as being ‘like Red Riding Hood; but with more sh*gging!” This had everyone in fits of giggles as the Revelators launched into some unadulterated Country Swamp Music with Billy and Richard creating some seriously eerie and atmospheric sounds around Angie’s sorrowful vocals.
The final song of the evening and her personal opus, ‘Weeping Wood’ will surely go down as one of the highlights of 2009 for all 100 or so people in the audience tonight and anyone else who hears it. Where do I start to describe something as ethereal as this song? Billy played a Gibson Les Paul and teased some amazingly spooky sounds out of it as Al on drums ‘pulled an assortment of shapes’ in the darkness at the back of the stage as he tub thumped as if his life depended on it. Ollie Collins adopted a 1,000 yard stare as he plucked and bowed his double bass like a threatening Weapon of Mass Destruction. Then there was Richard who finally got to let rip on his violin and wouldn’t have sounded out of place in the Hot Club d’Paris as Angie sang her deep dark tale with passion and gusto to a background of swirling lights and shadows!
A cold Winters night was heartily warmed up by one of the UK’s finest Country bands. I for one can’t wait for their return in the Autumn.

 


Angie Palmer - The Village Edinburgh - 16th September 2008

Review by Graeme Scott

It has been nearly two years since I last saw Angie perform live. Now almost permanently a resident of France she has returned to do a string of dates here in the UK in advance of her new album "Meanwhile As Night Falls" being released. However it was the familiar 'Fools Gold' to which Angie turned to open up her first set. Once again I was impressed throughout the evening with the dynamic range Angie brings to her songs. Drawing heavily on literature for inspiration Angie, and her writing partner Paul Mason, weave, often, complex tapestries of love, loss, strife and betrayal. The dreamy whimsical 'Down The Street Of The Cat Who Fished', 'Footprints In The Snow', 'Comin' Home' and 'The Ballad Of Love And Strife' plus 'Less Than I Need You' were all given an airing. The first of the new songs of the evening was a rather strange tale of a deceased Lucinda being given a final chance of redemption by being rescued from the devil. Lucinda blows the chance at the last moment and falls back to a doomed eternity in 'The Fiery Lake'. More new ones in the shape of 'On The Eve', 'I Hear That Locomotive', and a lovely lullaby 'Ile d'Yeu (Smugglers Song)' were enjoyed by the good-sized audience. 'Premonition Blues' and a cover of Townes Van Zandt's 'White Freightliner Blues' brought the evening to a close. Angie was excellent value for money on a wet Scottish night.


Angie Palmer at The Riverside, Conon Bridge March 3rd, 2009


It's always nice to find a congenial venue to hear some live music and The Riverside's certainly that. Good beer, good atmosphere and a comfortable mezzanine area to sit around and listen, to Angie Palmer in this case. A Lancashire lass who's relocated to France, she turned up with one fifth of her full band, namely Billy Buckley. He picked out a seemingly endless run of inventive tunefulness on all things guitar; his dobro and lap steel playing were particular fun and I kept looking forward to the 'middle eight' to see what he would come up with next.
I hadn't come across Angie Palmer before but I'd heard tell that she was a British Lucinda Williams. I couldn't see that to be honest; my ear picked out something of the earnestness and warm vocals of Eleanor McEvoy and something of the sly humour of Eliza Gilkyson. What was really enjoyable was the switched-on nature of her performance, a really controlled commitment to the performance of each song. I can't report much on the content of her songs, first acquaintance obviously leaves only a fleeting impression but I enjoyed her introduction to a new, Radio 2 friendly, song. Apparently they favour a jaunty tune with no more than 14 seconds of intro, which is exactly what Angie had written. 'Deep Blue Sea' had one of those jolly little tunes that you would whistle as you walked down the street if anybody whistled any more.
This was a 'Pass The Hat' promotion and I cheerrfully put my contribution in the hat in appreciation of a pleasant Sunday afternoon, well spent.

Manchester Swap Festival 

Academy 2 

 

 

Angie Palmer’s world is one of gentle vivacity. Sadly there wasn’t many who had turned up early enough to catch her excellence at the Academy 2, but stripped down and powered-up, those that didn’t make it missed a treat. Her sound belies her Lancashire birth, and the rich rhythms of her songs sprang with country themes, tender mercies and fiery passion. 

(Festival Review: CL)

 

 

Westmoreland Gazette

Angie Palmer: Brewery Arts Centre, Kendal

 The last time Angie played here she was on her own supporting Kathryn Williams. This time she was back with her her band “The Revelators” and was playing to a sell-out crowd.

Over two hours Angie treated the packed crowd to an outstanding performance that showcased her new CD “Road” and some amazing covers, notably Utah Phillip’s “Rock Salt and Nails” and Townes Van Zandt's “Whitefreightliner Blues”. But it is her own songs that people came to hear and she didn’t disappoint. Beginning with a short acoustic set and then bringing on the full band Angie delivered country, folk, blues, with her own distinctive stamp. There were many highlights, my own favourites are the storytelling songs like “Footprints in the Snow” and the captivating “Down the Street of the Cat Who Fished”. 

She is now getting great reviews for “Road” and will be back again here soon, my advice is to  book early to make sure you see this fabulous singer-songwriter.

 

 

Maverick

Fred Eaglesmith and Angie Palmer.

 St Bonaventures, Bristol

 

Supporting was Angie Palmer, whose superb album Road, released last year, attracted the sort of reviews you just don’t associate with British singer-songwriters. As someone in the audience said, if she was American the music magazines would be falling over themselves to put her on the cover.

She has a bright personality, her years of busking and playing street cafes has served her well as a confident and mature performer. She also writes exquisite uplifting songs with thoughtful narrative lyrics and her sometimes surreal imagery shows a nod towards Dylan and to Gillian Welch. Her major work, Down The Street Of The Cat Who Fished was the real highspot in what was an excellent set.

Manchester Evening News 

Event: Angie Palmer
Venue: The Duchess
Town: York
Date: September 24 2009

I bumped into Angie Palmer outside The Duchess just as dusk approached on a relatively warm York evening, just as the singer-songwriter was making her way down to the neighbouring Fibbers night club, where another gig was about to commence. 'Hope you're not escaping to another gig' I said as she walked towards me with her companion. 'No, we're just going to see some friends before they go on, Wreckless Eric's on downstairs tonight'. This may be the reason behind my recent rant on why everyone seems to disappear in York whenever anyone of importance is playing. Perhaps there's just too much going on at the same time and choices have to be made!

Angie delayed her visit 'downstairs' to speak to me for ten minutes whilst the sound of the two support bands filtered throughout the darkened corridors of The Duchess during their respective sound checks. The Lancaster born singer-songwriter was seemingly relaxed before the gig, wearing tight denim jeans and black waistcoat, as any self respecting rock chick should, as we sat and discussed everything from Dylan and Debussy to travelling though Europe, playing with a superb bunch of musicians collectively known as The Revelators and most importantly, her current album 'Meanwhile, as Night Falls..'

Later, after two excellent support spots by Suzy Bradley and the Morning After and the fabulously tight Jen Low Band, Angie Palmer walked onto stage with an acoustic guitar, a bunch of well-crafted and easily assessable songs and was flanked by an ensemble of excellent players, all completely in tune with every single move their leader made.

Opening with three consecutive songs from her current album, the Alan Gregson (Cornershop) produced 'Meanwhile, as Night Falls..', Angie soon fell into a relaxed groove during "On the Eve", "The Fiery Lake" and "After the Lights Have Gone", all pretty much exactly how they appear on the album. For the delightful "After the Lights Have Gone", Angie urged the audience to pull up some comfortable chairs and come a little closer. A true artist knows instinctively how to make the best out of a not so good situation. If the room isn’t bursting at the seams, then draw the small audience in, come a little closer, let's get intimate.

The atmosphere was intimate and the audience did indeed move closer to the band, which consisted of birthday boy Billy Buckley on guitars, Richard Curran on fiddle and mandolin, Ollie Collins on bass and Sophie Hasting on drums. Revisiting her two previous albums Road (2005) and Tales of Light and Darkness (2006), with the hard rocking "Fishtails" and the equally powerful "Footprints in the Snow" from the former and the funky "Letters From Home" and "Fool’s Gold" and finally a song which Angie referred to as a 'rarity', the love song "Michelangelo" from the latter, Angie demonstrated a good cross section of songs from her most important period.

Two more songs from the new album were selected for the set including the Johnny Cash inspired rocker "I Hear That Locomotive", which Angie invited the audience to provide suitable train sounds, which to a York audience shouldn’t be too difficult. Then the adult version of Little Red Riding Hood, "Hunting the Wolf", introduced in French, produced one of the highlights of the night both in terms of tightness of arrangement, including Billy Buckley's astonishing sneer of a guitar solo, and in tension building, courtesy of Ollie Collins' bowed bass and Richard Curran's demonic fiddle playing. One of the songs I was most looking forward to hearing live and one that was more than satisfactorily realised tonight.

The final song, which really couldn’t be followed by an encore, was the magnificent "Weeping Wood", the song that concludes the new album. I knew it was coming as Angie had told me in advance of the gig that she would be performing it. 'But can you possibly give it the full whack?' I asked before the show. 'We'll give it as much welly as we can but obviously we can't bring the full string section, or an organ or a large gong', Angie cheerfully responded. Judging by the satisfied expression on the faces of each and every member of the audience tonight, I think it was just right.

Allan Wilkinson


Angie Palmer: Britons Protection Manchester 

(With Anne McCue) 

One question always remains after a new artist has received so many great reviews: can they cut it live? Well given that Palmer has spent most of her adult life doing just that (albeit busking around Europe) she should have got the hang of it by now. Having said that there is a world of difference between playing for your supper and playing in front of a paying crowd. The omens were not good for this gig as the PA was so bad as to be unusable and so Angie and Anne said that they would do an ‘unplugged’ session and we had to imagine that we were at a “house gig”. So there we were 60 strong, not daring to move...

I can report that she certainly can cut it live. With just her voice (what a voice!) and an acoustic guitar Angie treated us to virtuoso display. Ranging form the delicate, beautiful “Less Than I Need You” to the storming “Footprints in the Snow” and taking in country, blues, folk, and rock Angie held the crowd quietly in the palm of her hand, except when they were on their feet clapping and shouting. The highlight of the show was the beguiling “Down the Street of the cat Who Fished” a nine-minute trip down a strange street where you can meet Godot, Narcissus, Desdemona and many more

Angie’s Cd “Road” has been getting such great reviews and the unflagging support of people like Bob Harris (as is Anne McCue, nice to see two of Bob’s favourites on the same bill) and it is no wonder. At last here is an English woman who can compete with the Americans.

 

  

“Why Exciting Angie is Certain to be Invited Back “ 

Angie Palmer: The Prom. (Bristol Evening Post)  

It is a strange thing that, while there has been a steady stream of exceptionally talented female singer-songwriters invading our shores from America, their British counterparts have been slow to surface. In fact you would be hard pushed to find enough to count on one hand. Which is why Angie Palmer, from Lancashire, is creating so much excitement, for her most recent album. Road, shows a writer and singer every bit as good as many of the Americans.

In front of a packed house, accompanied by her own guitar she proved she was as good a live performer as a recording artist. She writes intelligent, very visual lyrics and her songs are melodic and well-crafted, especially Footprints In The Snow, Comin' Home and The Ballad of Love and Strife. The nine-minute-long Down The Street of The Cat Who Fished, set in a real alley in Paris, contains some remarkably surreal imagery.

Angie has a great voice, which ranges from surprisingly low to high head notes as she showed on Satellites. She famously learned her craft busking to Parisian cinema queues, and with her own song, Fishtails, and covers of Townes Van Zandt's classic White Freight Liner and Utah Phillip's bitter Rock, Salt and Nails she showed she can belt with real power. She said: "This is my first time in Bristol. I hope I'll be back." I don't doubt she will, and very soon.